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Splash Spring 2017
Course Catalog

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Walk-in Activity Physical Education
Humanities Chemical and Physical Sciences
Lunch Life Skills and Hobbies
Mathematics and Computer Science Biological and Medical Sciences
Social Sciences Visual and Performing Arts
Engineering Earth and Planetary Sciences

Under construction
The class list below may change up until the weekend of the program



Visual and Performing Arts

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A5900: How to Sing in an A Capella Group! Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Park

Do you like to sing? Have you ever thought about singing with other talented musicians? Want to know if Pitch Perfect is actually real A Capella? If you answered yes to any of those questions, come to Everyday People's A Capella seminar where we'll teaching as well as performing some of the songs that we sing throughout the year. No prior experience is necessary, just come with an open mind and be ready to sing with others!


Prerequisites
Any interest in music or singing!

A5894: A History of Photography for Fun: Tracing Light to Instagram
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Eric Zelikman

Although photography has existed in some form for centuries, the role of photography at a sub-hobbyist level has changed substantially over that span including its boom in the past several years. Look at the purposes and artistic value of these photographs and discuss the implications of the evolution of its constraints as a medium.

A5908: Music and Arts at Stanford
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Son Nguyen

Come hear about being involved in music and art in college from current Stanford students!

A5599: Anything Can Be Poetry: Performance and the Art Monster
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Michelle Jia

Writing poetry, and want to get it off the page? Interested in soulful, experimental performance poetry, spoken word, or slam poetry? Come to this workshop to push the boundaries of what is possible.


Prerequisites
Bring 1 idea for a performance poetry piece; already-written or just a seed is fine.

A5672: Timeless Motions: How to Make Animation out of Everyday Objects
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Songhee Han, Amy Liu

Have you ever wondered what goes on in your brain while watching your favorite animated TV shows or movies? Behind every successful (and unsuccessful) animation, motion and vision are interacting in an intricate way inside your brain. Learn more about the perception of motion and the persistence of vision as we make our own zoetropes and flipbook animations out of objects you can easily find!

A5691: Film Appreciation and Discussion Full!
Difficulty: *

We will be watching A Serious Man by the Coen Brothers and having an hour of discussion about the movie and its related themes and philosophical questions afterwards.


Prerequisites
None

A5770: Learn to Juggle! Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Erin Bennett

Come hang out with some members of Stanford's juggling club, Down With Gravity, and learn how to juggle 3 juggling balls. We've taught hundreds of people how to juggle. Anyone can learn!

A5538: Art Crime Through the Ages
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aubrey Beam

Art has been around since as early as 28,000 BCE (and possibly earlier!) and has continued on to today. Art gives an interesting look into different cultures and time periods that can sometimes illuminate more than history texts can. However, the 'life' of the artworks themselves can also be something worth looking into. Works have been destroyed or stolen throughout time and that is the focus of this class. We will be looking at various art crimes and thefts from the prehistoric times to the modern day. Come prepared to look at some awesome art!

A5628: K-pop Dance Workshop: SNSD The Boys Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cindy Jiang

Come learn the dance to The Boys by Girls Generation (SNSD). If you're interested in K-pop or dance, this is the place for you!

Check out this link for the dance video: https://youtu.be/XbDc7T8V3nQ


Prerequisites
No dance experience necessary! Bring a water bottle and wear shoes that are easy to dance in.

A5804: Drawing From Life
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Yutao Liu

Discover new ways of seeing.
Develop your style of expression.
Capture the moment.

A5482: Performing Shakespeare
Difficulty: *

Come join members of the Stanford Shakespeare Company and learn the basics of performing a Shakespeare scene! Shakespearean language can seem pretty difficult and intimidating when you read it in English class, but when you see it performed you can understand it. His tragedies can be sad and moving, and his comedies are filled with bad puns and ridiculous fight scenes. We will teach you how to use the text to inform your character and how to use your body to help tell the story. No acting experience is required, but a willingness to be silly is highly recommended.

A5534: Drumming 100!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kyle Enriquez

Is your life comsumed by beating on your desk with pencils or fingers? Want to put those skills to use? Sign up for this class, where I will hook you up with a set of sticks for the hour, and teach you how to use them. The goal is to introduce you to drums, drumming, and some skills to practice as you move forward in your drumming careers, whether that be drumming for a band, or tapping your fingers through a math test. All skill levels accepted!


Prerequisites
Even the slightest interest in drumming.

A5687: Stage Design
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amber Levine

This class will give a brief, lecture-style overview of the process of designing a full set for a stage production, from analyzing the script and doing research to coming up with a design and creating communicative drawings or models. The instructor will use an example from her own stage design experience. At the end of the class there will be time to practice drawing techniques and ask questions.

A5883: Singing Stories
Difficulty: **

Join members of Stanford Talisman to talk about music and storytelling, and learn a song together. Stanford Talisman is a singing group that aims to share world music that tells stories. In this session, students will start by joining Talisman members in a vocal warm up. Understanding the origin of the music we sing is very important to the group, so we will begin by talking about the history of the song and how the song is used in its original setting. Once we understand this context, we will learn the piece in vocal parts (basses, tenors, altos, sopranos), learning more about the technicalities of good singing. As a big finale, we will sing the song altogether and Talisman will do a mini performance of some of our other selections. We hope students walk away with a greater appreciation for world music, collective singing and sharing stories.


Prerequisites
Willingness to sing

A5618: From Records to Rihanna: DJing on the Radio
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Akshay Jaggi

Do you have a taste in music that just needs to be shared with the world? Do you listen to the radio and think "I could do that"? Well even if you think DJing sounds like the most complicated thing in the world, it isn't! We'll go over the basics of song queueing, transitioning, beat matching, and more! The class will spend the first two hours covering the FCC's music regulations, important equipment know how, and then spend the second half of the class getting our hands dirty on some state-of-the-art equipment at Stanford's own radio station. We have turntables, CD players, mics, and more. By the end of the class, all the students will have their own .mp3 of their recordings!

Disclaimer: Some songs may contain explicit lyrics.

A5675: Introduction to eTextiles Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Iris Howley

Have you ever wanted to make clothing that lights up? In this class we'll introduce you to a few simple electronics that you can use to make wearable items embedded with LED lights.

This class will provide some time to work on hand-sewing skills with embroidery thread and felt. We'll also learn how to paper prototype our projects and lay out the electronic components. Finally, we'll combine all these new skills to make a light-up bracelet.

A5696: How To TAP Into Your Potential
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Julia Leal

Following a brief warm-up and some across-the-floors, this intermediate level tap workshop will consist of learning a combo taught by a member of Stanford tapTH@T, ending with improv. Come ready to share a passion for dance and TAP into your potential!


Prerequisites
Moderate amount of dance background, preferably tap

A5792: Graffiti Art & Identity Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Ngoc Bui

What is graffiti? What is its importance in hip hop, culture, and society? How can graffiti be used as a means of creating and expressing one's identity?

We will explore what graffiti is and how it came to be as a unique art form to understand its role in the world. We will also look at graffiti art from around the world. We will then use this as inspiration to create our own piece of graffiti art that expresses our unique style and identity.

A5805: From Yves to McQueen: a Global Fashion History
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mitzi Harris

This class will explore the complexities of the global fashion world. Through hands-on exploration, fashion shows, documentary clips, and lecture, this class will provide students with a stronger understanding of the fashion world and all of the possible jobs within it. This class will also highlight some of the most influential people in the history of fashion, and how times have changed since the industry was conceived. Because fashion is largely influenced by social, political, and economic factors in the world around us, anyone interested in the factors that make the industry what it has become today would love this class!


Biological and Medical Sciences

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B5479: Parasites: Real Life Vampires and Zombies Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Sarah Bauer

Come learn about some of the cool and scary parasites affecting people and their pets around the world. We will discuss a number of parasites including malaria, sleeping sickness, tapeworms, hookworms and many others. We will learn about how these parasites are transmitted, where in the world they are found, and what medicines (if any) there are to treat them. If you are squeamish, be ready to avert your eyes! Some of these parasites are super gross (or cool depending on your interests :D).


Prerequisites
Basic Biology

B5639: Drug Resistance: A Threat for Treatment Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Rajiv Gaur

Drug resistance is huge problem in treatment of infectious disease. More awareness and better management of drug is necessary to overcome drug resistance.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of biology.

B5650: Sharing Wrong Decisions in Medicine
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tristan Lerbs

Helping patients is certainly one of the most rewarding experiences of medical practice. To provide that help, a lifelong learning process is necessary. This process is not just based on textbooks and journals, but also greatly depends on experiences. These experiences may be good ones. But even by treating patients as thoroughly as possible, wrong decisions will ultimately occur. To everyone. Wrong decisions do not contradict that reasonable care was provided. They do not imply mistakes. But the question should be raised if a better care could have been possible. That question may be annoying and embarrassing. But it will ultimately improve patient care. Although conferences in which these problems are discussed have become more widespread, a more sharing atmosphere could become reality.

Before coming to Stanford, I had been working as a first and second year resident in General Surgery and Internal Medicine in Germany. During our lecture, I want to share my experiences about my own decisions that retrospectively turned out to be wrong. Independently from the major and profession that you will choose, I would like to encourage you to critically think about our society's way to deal with wrong decisions (and mistakes).

B5803: The Tree of Everything
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chao Jiang

All living species today share the same common ancestor, or so you were told at school (hopefully). What evidences, besides the "unreliable" fossil records, do we scientist have to show this? The secret lies in the essence of all living species on earth (and maybe somewhere else in the universe, we are not sure yet) -- the DNA.


Prerequisites
Somewhat familiar with the theory of evolution and DNA. A curious and open mind if you don't :)

B5876: History of Molecular Biology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Catherine Stark

Come one come all to listen to the fascinating story of the history of molecular biology. We will embark on a journey to understand some of the key experiments that elucidated the central dogma and formed the framework for current understanding of how life works at the molecular level.


Prerequisites
curiosity! wonder! excitement!

B5548: The Charles Darwin Comic Strip Full!
Difficulty: *

Come to hear the story of how Charles Darwin came to develop his theory of evolution! In this class your inner artist and biologist will meet as you learn to draw a comic strip to tell Darwin's story.

B5660: How to Build a Tree of Life
Difficulty: ***

Most of us have seen phylogenetic or evolutionary trees before, that show how different forms of life evolved and branched from a common ancestor. Have you ever wondered how these "trees of life" are built? This class will give an introduction to the biochemical tools and computer algorithms used to construct phylogenetic trees.

B5771: Mushroom Mania!
Difficulty: **

What do cheese, zombie ants and the biggest, oldest living thing have in common? Fungi! Mushrooms are the part of the a fungus that we see, but they're just the tip of the iceberg. Most of the action takes place out of sight.

Come learn about the hidden world of fungi in this interactive course. You will learn about the ecology, evolution, and human uses of fungi, and will get hands-on practice identifying mushrooms on your own!

B5797: Mini Me: DNA Extraction Lab Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Crystal Perez

In this class we will learn about animal cell features, and then put our knowledge into practice by extracting our own DNA from cheek cells!


Prerequisites
Some knowledge on biology recommended

B5811: Biology at Molecular and Social Scales: Understanding Gene Editing and the Need for CRISPR Policy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bruce Tiu

Heard of CRISPR? (if not, it stands for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats!) It’s the next big thing, says everyone; it’s set to revolutionize research and medical therapies and advance our understanding of biology faster than anything before. And it’s true, with the importance of genes in affecting disease risk, wouldn’t it be great if we could just magically fix the genetic basis of any illness? Just how exactly does it all work?

Still, the new potential of gene editing enabled by CRISPR opens up new possibilities for both benefits and risks. CRISPR could conceivably be used by groups with malicious intent to modify and increase the pathogenicity of biological threats. And what ethical questions surround the use of CRISPR for medical purposes? Are designer babies next?

In this hybrid class, which seeks to intersect hard science with considerations of social impact, we will first explore the biological mechanism of CRISPR and potential applications in research and medicine. After developing an understanding of the science, we will turn to discuss the biosecurity concerns coming with novel technologies when there is a dearth of sufficient policy or infrastructure. Students will gain an understanding of CRISPR and come away more prepared to think about policies regulating the responsible use of technology.


Prerequisites
Some biology background, knowledge of DNA, RNA, protein

B5823: Mind and Body: How Your Mind Makes It Real
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Can a sugar-pill cause morphine release? Can hypnosis cure blindness? Can looks kill (literally)? Can getting shot not hurt?

We'll talk about old history and new science developing around "mind-body" medicine, how your mind and brain affect your body in really interesting ways. We'll meet people with paralysis who can regain their movement, and blind people can regain their sight by the power of words. We'll see how the brain can produce pain completely independently of any "physical" cause.

We'll discuss theories of how the brain might be involved in diseases like fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome.

If that's not enough, you'll learn about ritual executions that rely on the victim's expectation, and soldiers in WWII who get shot but don't seem to mind.

In short, we'll explore the strange and perplexing frontier where Mind meets Body.

B5839: My Sweet DNA! Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Salome Botelho

Introduction to DNA chemistry, DNA structure. Isolation of DNA from saliva and fruits. Understanding the chemical process behind DNA isolation.

Introduction to PCR and CSI-PCR/Restriction enzyme protocols

B5503: What Your Body Looks Like On The Inside Full!
Difficulty: ***

Students will learn about human anatomy using cadavers and 3-D visual tools. Various anatomical regions will be covered including the head and neck, abdomen, upper limb, lower limb, back, and heart/lung.


Prerequisites
Caution: Real human cadavers are used in the teaching of this course.

B5617: Speaking the language of the brain
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Daitch

How does your brain inform you whether your dinner plate is filled with a juicy steak or a smelly pile of mush? And how does the brain use this information to guide your behavior (i.e. should you eat whatever is on your plate?). In the first part of this class, students will learn about the way neurons in the brain communicate with one another. Then, students will divide into groups, each group representing one part of the brain, and each student acting out a neuron in that brain region. We'll see if students can successfully send a message between brain regions by speaking the "language of the brain"

B5635: Intro to Neuroscience: How Your Brain Works

Have you ever wondered how your brain learns to store and retrieve your memories? How you learned to speak? In this course we will discuss what we currently know about the brain, as well as the cutting-edge strategies neuroscientists are using to solve the remaining mysteries. You will learn basic principles and exciting tricks that the brain uses to solve problems that you encounter every day.


Prerequisites
Having a brain

B5643: Genetic Engineering: Powerful Tools from Unexpected Places
Difficulty: **

Biological research often utilizes discoveries in weird creatures to solve problems in human health. From glowing jellyfish to a bacterial immune system, learn about how our powerful genetic engineering tools are built upon unexpected findings in seemingly random organisms. This class will cover the history of some of these tools, overview current cutting edge techniques, and end with a discussion on the future of genetic engineering.

B5784: Evolution: the Saga of Life
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michael Dubreuil

Evolution: the process that's responsible for all life you see around you. In this class, you'll get a brief introduction to the process of evolution and hear a collection of interesting evolutionary stories from eye evolution to how humans are still evolving today.

B5903: Brain Basics: How Our Brains Encode Who We Are
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chris Miller

This class will explore the basic structure and function of the nervous system and show students how the brain enables and encodes sensation, movement, language, memory, personality, thoughts, behaviors, and emotions--as well as tell the fascinating stories of how scientific pioneers made these remarkable discoveries.

B5517: 21st Century Sherlock: Biology Course for Detectives
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Shein Ei Cho

Have you ever wondered how your favorite detectives in TV shows and movies solve crimes? What biological techniques and knowledge do they use?

Wonder no further.

In this class, we will learn the basic biology behind crime investigation. Then we will break into groups to solve a mystery case.

So gather around detectives, justice needs you!


Prerequisites
Basic biology knowledge, especially genetics is useful but not required. Most importantly, bring your curiosity and love for mysteries!

B5608: The Biology of Sugars and Fats
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Giovanni Forcina

All of life is composed of four basic building blocks: nucleic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. However, most science courses focus solely on DNA, RNA, and proteins ignoring the essential and complex contributions of carbohydrates (sugars) and lipids (fats).

This course will explore the essential role of these, often ignored, components of life.


Prerequisites
Some basic cell biology will be helpful, but not essential.

B5744: Exploring Exposure to Your Environment
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Laura Kwong

Learn how our physical, chemical, and biological environment impacts human health through this introduction to exposure science. Exposure science explores the many ways we interact with the world around us and how these interactions can affect our health.


Prerequisites
none

B5476: Cell Cycle (and Cancer)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: KC Farrell

What controls when and how a cell divides? The answer isn't simple! A cell must double its DNA and split into two, and this whole process occurs in a cycle of events called the cell cycle. In this class we will explore control mechanisms and machinery involved in the cell cycle. We will explore how a cell makes the decisions divide and how division occurs. We will watch videos of and compare cell cycles in different types of cells. In addition, we will discuss contributions of cell cycle alterations to tumor formation and cancer progression.


Prerequisites
basic biology (parts of cell, genes, proteins)

B5478: Human Parasites: Real Life Vampires and Zombies
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Sarah Bauer

Come learn about some of the cool and scary parasites affecting people around the world. We will discuss a number of human parasites including malaria, sleeping sickness, tapeworms, hookworms and many others. We will learn about how these parasites are transmitted, where in the world they are found, and what medicines (if any) there are to treat them. If you are squeamish, be ready to avert your eyes! Some of these parasites are super gross (or cool depending on your interests :D).


Prerequisites
Basic biology

B5484: From Bouncing Molecules to Stripes and Spines
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bruno Beltran

Did you know that your body is made up of more than 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 molecules?

From zebra stripes, to patterns on snakes, to the spacing between the bones in your spine, biological systems have to control their organization by positioning individual molecular signals in this sea of molecules.

With so many chemicals floating around, how do organisms control the position of individual molecules? In this class, we will go over various examples of how cells use their genes to create the beautiful and intricate patterns that allow life to exist, even when each individual molecule inside you seems to move completely randomly. There will be cool videos.

This class will not overlap in content with 5107; the two will complement each other well.


Prerequisites
Students should have encountered the idea that all matter is made of molecules, and that chemical reactions happen when two molecules collide with each other. Students should also have encountered the idea that genes are read by the cell to make proteins.

B5547: Biology Scavenger Hunt
Difficulty: *

Come explore the variety of life on campus! In the first part of this class, we will go outside for a scavenger hunt to collect and observe flora and fauna. Next, we will classify our organisms using dichotomous keys and learn about how biologists classify the dizzying array of life forms on our planet!

B5636: The Science Behind Modern Frankenstein
Difficulty: **

Imagine a world where humans could glow like jellyfish. How close are we to achieving this goal? Come find out. We will explore the first principles of biochemistry and cutting-edge genome editing techniques. Armed with the basics, we'll reason through generating glowing Frankenstein and potential shortfalls (if any). At the end, let's draw and paint using engineered glowing bacteria.

B5648: Biophysics: How Life Works, From Molecules to Cells
Difficulty: ***

Biologists study living systems that function through a vast variety of complex mechanisms. Physicists search for fundamental, mathematical laws of nature that drive physical phenomena. Biophysicists combine these two approaches, seeking to understand life in a physical way. In this class, you will learn about cutting-edge research in this exciting field from two Stanford Biophysics graduate students. Topics covered will range from the structure and dynamics of biological molecules to the surprisingly clever behavior of cells.


Prerequisites
Some background in biology, chemistry, and/or physics is helpful, but not required.

B5609: Engineering the Prosthetic Limb
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mia Leonard

Medical devices are part of a growing industry; come learn more about the neuroscience and engineering behind prosthetic limbs, of the traditional variety, and of recent developments in medicine: limbs you move with your mind!


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of biology

B5642: How Animals Shape Biological Research
Difficulty: **

When biologists want to research how the human body works, they often turn to the animal world for help. Learn about how using special characteristics of animals like shape, color, and size have helped scientists understand how we work!

B5616: Get the Gist Without the Jargon: How to Read a Scientific Paper
Difficulty: ***

The ability to read and understand a scientific paper is a valuable skill to learn before entering college, where you will be expected to use these primary sources in classes and assignments. In addition, being able to read and understand primary literature is a fun and important way to learn about the world around you. This course will introduce students to the challenging task of reading and understanding a scientific paper. We will focus on a paper in the field of biology and medicine, but the skills learned in this course will apply to other areas of interest. We will learn how to read a scientific paper in the context of relaying that information to the public. We will compare scientific papers to news articles written about the findings and practice reading and communicating science with an example paper by the end of class.

B5622: What is Sex? Biology, Sex, and Gender
Difficulty: *

What makes you male, female... or intersex? If you have never heard of intersex, you should come to this class to learn more!

We will discuss the biology of sex determination in humans and in some other interesting species. (Did you know that some species have temperature-dependent sex determination?)

We will also spend time discussing how biological sex relates to gender and sexuality. If biological sex is not black and white (male/female), what does that mean for gender and sexuality in our society?

Everyone is welcome (LGBTQIA++), this is a safe environment!

B5623: Deep Sea Microbes Full!
Difficulty: **

What’s tiny and living at the bottom of the ocean? Microbes! Come learn how microbes make a living miles away from the sunlight and how scientists learn about them. This class will introduce you to microbial life in the deep sea and provide you with a hands-on laboratory experience.

B5764: Genetic inheritance with Reebops
Difficulty: **

We had been breeding plants and animals, selecting for desirable traits, for thousands of years before we knew how those traits were transmitted from parents to their children.

Mendel made a ground breaking discovery of the laws of inheritance in the 1860s. We will explore his laws by breeding Reebops. Reebops are fantastical marshmallow creatures with several traits, such as straight or curly tails, that are inherited according to Mendel's laws. We will also learn the secrets of Mendel's success and why Mendel is still relevant today.

B5738: Intro to Understanding Research Design Full!
Difficulty: *

How do you come up with a research idea? How do you test it? Research is nothing but the process of being curious about life, asking questions and using logic and reasoning to test and answer these questions. In this class, we will understand research design through examples and practice research problems.


Prerequisites
Please come with a burning question that you would like to 'study'. For example, 'How does cancer start?' or 'How do we age?'. Your question can be in any field or topic!

B5460: Pre-Med Panel
Difficulty: **

Interested in pursuing a career in medicine? Curious what it takes during undergrad and medical school? Come hear from a panel of speakers about their experiences and tips as pre-med and medical students at Stanford!

B5513: Life is Chemistry Full!
Difficulty: ***

What is the boundary between the living and the non-living? DNA, RNA and proteins are seemingly non-living, so how do they orchestrate life? How could something as complex as life originate from non-living matter? Is life simply a set of chemical reactions?

Such questions will form the basis in this course to review some pioneering findings from molecular biology and genetics. The course will be divided into two parts: a 30 minute lecture followed by a 1 hour discussion on the broad implications of the science discussed in the lecture.

We hope that by understanding the chemical basis of life, students will gain a deeper appreciation for the biological discoveries they encounter in the future (be it through the news or their own research!).


Prerequisites
An interest in basic science and biology.

B5535: The Principles of Biochemistry
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Kyle Enriquez

Your everyday life is a series of chemical reactions. Every movement, every thought, every taste, every action you take is the product of chemical interactions between your cells and the environment around you. This class will introduce you to some basic biochemistry topics, and I will conclude with some emerging research in the field and some research that I have completed.


Prerequisites
Basic Biology and Chemistry, a passion for science, and if you can think of some introductory Biochemistry questions that you may have!

B5746: Viruses, The Body, and YOU! Full!
Difficulty: **

Ever wondered what ZOMBIES and VIRUSES have in common?

Do you want to know what the flu vaccine is all about?

Are all germs the same? What makes viruses different from bacteria, fungi, and other parasites?

Join us as we discover what viruses are, how they can enter your body, and how we fight viruses and prevent disease!

B5813: Genetic Engineering: DNA Repair and CRISPR-Cas
Difficulty: **

Three billion base pairs have to be replicated accurately every time a human cell divides - and a single mistake could mean disaster. This class provides an overview of the incredible cellular mechanisms that pull off the feat of DNA replication a hundred billion times a day, as well as the emerging application of this knowledge to genetic editing using technologies such as CRISPR/Cas.


Prerequisites
Interest in biology and bioengineering!

B5874: DNA biology Full!
Difficulty: **

In this class you will learn what DNA is made of, what DNA can do and learn how you can extract DNA using common kitchen items.


Prerequisites
Basic interest in biology

B5685: Mind, Body, Food & You: What We Eat and Why We Eat It
Difficulty: **

What should we be eating to enhance the connections between mind, body, and food? Come learn about what we eat, why we eat it, and how the food we eat shapes our minds, body, and performance.

B5736: Degeneration, Regeneration and Aging
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Chandresh Gajera

This class will explore how aging, specifically brain aging, is affected by an imbalance in homeostasis. Immortal youth may be science fiction but current science is attempting systematic approach to extend youthful years. Modern biology are tackling major questions at the molecular, cellular, systemic, and organismal levels. The idea is to add life to years rather than years to life. This class will give a quick overview of aging, particularly brain aging, and will then concentrate on the latest research.

B5751: Biological Breakthroughs
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Eggold

CRISPR, PCR, SDS-PAGE, FISH, RFLP, IF, CyTOF, MIBI, ATAC-seq, ChIP, ACT, CAR. From this list of biological techniques, you can probably tell that scientists really like acronyms! But what else can these techniques tell us? This class will provide an overview of groundbreaking biological techniques that have been developed within the last few decades, with a focus on why they are so useful. We will also spend time discussing the future potentials of biological research to improve our lives. If you’re interested in biology, scientific research, love to think creatively, or want to learn about some awesome technology, this class is for you!


Prerequisites
Understanding of basic biological principles (cells, DNA, protein)

B5783: Modern Techniques in Biology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michael Dubreuil

This is an informal class that will go over a few techniques that are used in biology laboratories from Stanford to Beijing, from small academic labs to biotechnology giants like Genentech. Examples include PCR, sequencing, and antibody-based procedures


Prerequisites
Basic Biology class, basic knowledge about DNA

B5905: A Shot in the Dark
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michal Tal

From the first Smallpox vaccine to current efforts to design vaccines against HIV, Ebola, and ZIKA, we will discuss how vaccines work and the current controversy surrounding them.

B5909: Exploring Exposure to Your Environment
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Laura Kwong

Learn how our physical, chemical, and biological environment impacts human health through this introduction to exposure science. Exposure science explores the many ways we interact with the world around us and how these interactions can affect our health.


Prerequisites
none

B5655: Gastrointestinal Microbiota
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mackenzie Little

An intro into the fascinating ecosystem living inside our gut, and how it impacts our health in ways we are only just beginning to understand! By looking at some of the most influential discoveries (including a little look at faecal transplants!) we will hopefully discover that its all about maintaining a balance.

B5747: To Test or Not to Test? The Ethical Debates of Testing For Huntington's Disease
Difficulty: *

Come explore genetic testing and what it means to have Huntington's disease. If you could find out you will develop a disease with no known cure, would you get genetically tested?


Prerequisites
None

B5506: Can Your DNA Predict Your Future?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trevor Martin

Is it possible to predict all the diseases you will get the moment you are born? Do our eating habits and lifestyle choices really influence our health much? Find out in this class what modern genetics and medicine have to say about these exciting questions and learn what knowing our DNA sequence really tells us about ourselves.

BONUS: Students will have the option of finding out their phenotype/genotype for a gene involved in tasting bitterness!


Prerequisites
Any sort of introduction to Biology course; should understand basics of DNA.

B5543: A Shot In The Dark
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michal Tal

From the first Smallpox vaccine to current efforts to design vaccines against HIV, Ebola, and ZIKA, we will discuss how vaccines work and the current controversy surrounding them.

B5625: Local Ecology and Native Plants: A Tour of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve
Difficulty: *

For this class, we'll be heading over to Stanford's very own Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. We'll take a look at some of the unique ecosystems and native plants present at the preserve on an hour-long, easy walk. We'll also see and discuss some of the active research being conducted at Jasper Ridge by Stanford faculty across many schools and departments. Transportation is provided!

Note: Students should bring shoes that are comfortable to walk in. Suggestions for other things to bring include: a water bottle, hat, sunscreen, and bug spray, if desired.


Prerequisites
None!

B5649: Molecular Biophysics: How Life Works at the Smallest Scale
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Andrew Savinov

At the smallest scale, life is made possible by very special molecules, including DNA, RNA, and proteins. Yet though they are special, these molecules follow the same physical rules as the rest of the universe. Molecular biophysics is the study of how these molecules of life physically work. In this class we will explore selected topics in molecular biophysics, looking at different examples of how biological molecules function and what experiments we can do to uncover these molecules’ mysteries.


Prerequisites
Some background in biology, chemistry, and/or physics is helpful, but not required.

B5765: Introduction to Global Health
Difficulty: **

What is global health? What are the social determinants of health and what is the distribution of inequality? This class will discuss "hot topics" in global health including Ebola, HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, climate change, and more! The course structure is a balance of a video, short lecture, discussion time and a fun, real-world case study.

B5824: Psychiatry and Philosophy: Understanding Reality With Help From Patients
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

What does it mean to be human? How can we know what is true? How can we make rational decisions? How can we make good choices? These three questions will be explored drawing on my experience as a psychiatrist treating patients with schizophrenia, depression and addiction. We will learn from patients, and understand ourselves better by learning from their experience.

We will also save a lot of time for class discussion. Bring your questions, and we'll have a good discussion about these most important questions.

Warning: We will be discussing cases of depression, schizophrenia and addiction. This class may produce strong emotions if you or someone you know have struggled with these conditions.

B5512: 3D Tissue Engineering: Building Body Parts! Full!
Difficulty: **

Imagine you were able to build human body parts. If someone had a dysfunctional kidney (diabetes) or heart (stroke), you would be able to build a healthy kidney or heart outside of the body and then put it back into the body to make the body function properly once again. While this may sound futuristic & science-fiction-like, tissue engineers are working to make this possible! In this class, you will learn the basic components and strategies of engineering tissues as well as the current challenges. The best part? We'll perform a hands-on laboratory simulating the creation of an engineered piece of tissue.

B5656: Optical Illusions Full!
Difficulty: **

Have you ever been fooled by an optical illusion? Have you ever wondered if what you see is what is really there? Our eyes and brain have interesting abilities to help us perceive the world around us, but sometimes we can be tricked due to these same abilities. In this class we'll explore some well-known optical illusions and learn about why they might work.

B5763: Tree Biology Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Henrietta Bennett

This course is a brief introduction to tree biology. Students will learn about how trees are studied, how to use a dichotomous key, and practice tree identification using specimens on the Stanford campus. We will discuss some of the different contexts in which trees are studied, including: evolution, ecology, agriculture, drug discovery, and climate change. We will also talk about some generally fascinating case studies in tree biology.


Prerequisites
None

B5472: Microscopy Techniques used in Biology Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Vivek Gupta

Biologists, physicists, and engineers are developing more advanced tools to analyze the vast array of processes vital to cell function. We will discuss a few of these techniques and the principles behind them such as fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, traction force microscopy, etc.


Prerequisites
Highschool or middle school biology

B5486: Preparing for the Pre-Med Path
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sharon Chen

I am currently an undergraduate Junior at Stanford intending to apply to medical school this upcoming fall. I grew up in the Bay Area and remember how lost I felt as a freshman in a public high school with its 1:600 counselor to student ratio. I knew that I wanted to do medicine in the future but did not have the slightest idea of where to start. For those of you who feel the same, come join me for a half-hour lecture on tips I wish I had known in high school followed by a Q&A session.

B5510: The Human Genome and Mendelian Diseases
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Johannes Birgmeier

This class will provide a basic introduction to the following questions:

* What's in the human genome? Important functions of the human genome?

* What if you mess up single, very important places in the genome? What is a Mendelian disease?

* How do you find out which mutations cause Mendelian diseases?

B5541: Hepatitis B 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Lin, Vivian Lou

Learn about hepatitis B and liver cancer through a short lecture followed by interactive games. Students will gain the knowledge to educate friends and family about this global health disparity.


Prerequisites
Come ready to learn and have fun!

B5682: Stem Cells, Regeneration and the Quest for Immortality
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ivan Carcamo-Oribe

Humans are complex organisms composed of billions of cells and more than 200 different cell types. Although some animals are able to regenerate whole limbs or organs, we are not. However, stem cells help us stay healthy and young everyday. Do you want to know how they help us and what we can do with them in the laboratory? Come by and bring your questions!

B5740: Speciation: Classifying the Biological World
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Michael Dubreuil

Ligers, Tigons, and wholphins, oh my! The concept of species has been used since the early days of biology to classify the natural world around us. However, we are ever coming to realize designating one species from another is not as easy as it first appears.

We will be talking about what makes a species, where our classifications break down, hybrid species, and the human species


Prerequisites
Introduction to Biology

B5768: Gender and Sex 101
Difficulty: *

In this class, students will have a quick lesson on gender, sexuality, and sexual health. Ample time will be given for the many questions students are bound to ask!


Prerequisites
Some biology is preferable, but not required. An open mind!

B5816: Symbiosis: A Love Story Between Corals and Dinoflagellates
Difficulty: *

Around the world, coral reefs are experiencing severe environmental stress and turning white, a.k.a "bleaching." What's going on during bleaching? What role do dinoflagellates (microscopic algae) play? And how can we test it?

Students will explore the science of symbiosis and current research through hands-on demonstrations with sea anemones.


Prerequisites
none, just be curious and willing to get salty. Please wear closed-toe shoes (i.e. no flip-flops)

B5832: Choose: The Science of Consciousness and Freewill
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Are humans free? Are we awake?

These common beliefs have recently been questioned by scientist and philosopher alike. Some claim our experience and actions are simply the result of physical law and necessity.

But what is the latest science? We'll discuss recent findings from neuroscience, biology and quantum mechanics. We'll loop in cognitive scientists and philosophers to gain some insight about these most important issues.

B5469: The Immunology Behind Pregnancy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amber Moore

Have you ever considered the immunology behind pregnancy? Have you ever wondered why humans reject organs transplants, yet women are able to carry babies for nine months? We will first cover the immune cells that are important in our day to day lives. Then we will discuss which immune cells participate in organ transplant rejection. Finally, we will learn about the immune cells that establish and support a healthy pregnancy.

B5470: Organ Transplantation: The Past, Present and Future Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amber Moore

Do you want to learn about the history of organ transplantation? How about the most recent news involving human tissue and cells being generated in pig and cattle embryos? Thanks to advancement in technology, genetics, stem cell biology and immunology, scientists and doctors have made much progress in the laboratory and in the clinic. We have come a long way in the field of transplantation, but we have much more to accomplish! Come and learn so that you can one day join us in saving lives.

B5779: Grocery Store Botany
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rachel Engstrand

Come learn about the amazing diversity, structure and evolutionary history of the plants you can get at the grocery store! Why did the mafia control the artichoke industry? What do mangoes and poison oak have in common? We'll learn the answers to all of these questions and many more.

We will have a short basic introduction to plant structures and then we will learn about the unexpected origin as well as some fun facts about the foods you eat everyday. Get hands-on practice identifying plant features on fruits and vegetables and enjoy some tasty snacks at the end.

B5877: The Creatures that Live Amongst Us: A Scientific Investigation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Becky Fu, Lamia Wahba

Have you ever wondered about the bugs you share the world with? The little ones you can't see with your own eyes? In this class we'll be taking a journey of discovery of the microscopic organisms living around us, and on us. We will be talking about what kind of bugs surround us, what they feed on, and why they are important to us.


Chemical and Physical Sciences

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C5821: High Tech Glass Research
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elizabeth Morin

Glass has applications beyond windows: i.e. laser glasses for driverless cars or tattoo removal, optical fibers for telecommunication, and glass for displays. Let's talk about display glass.

The key distinction between "chemically strengthened" display glass (i.e. iphone screens) and window glass is differences in range of cation sizes. We'll talk a bit about the "ion exchange" chemistry making this glass scratch resistant.

The majority of the time will be spent talking about a fundamental science research project looking at the effect of cation size on glass structure.

One of my goals is to talk about how high school class labs and university research labs differ. Do you have any questions about what science research is like? I'll do my best to walk you through how this research project started, who did what, and its outcomes. :)

About me: I'm a Stanford graduate student with an college degree from Penn State. I just finished most of the degree requirements for the PhD degree and will be graduating in the Spring.


Prerequisites
Some high school chemistry is helpful, i.e. familiarity with terms and concepts like cation, anion, ionic and covalent bond, bond strength. I welcome hand raising to ask questions about science if something doesn't make sense.

C5550: Science on the Back of the Envelope: Order of Magnitude Analysis
Difficulty: ***

How did the ancient Greeks measure the diameters of the Earth and the Moon? How could the ancient Greeks have measured the distance from Earth to the Moon or the Sun? (Fun fact: they probably didn't. But you can outsmart the Greeks!) How much energy does Earth actually receive from the Sun? Does how high you jump depend on your body mass? How many atoms make up an adult human body?

In this class, we will explore the art of estimation using tools from math and physics. We are not aiming for perfection, only to get within an order of magnitude (a factor of 10)! Through the class, we hope you will appreciate the usefulness of quick-and-dirty calculations in both everyday and scientific applications.


Prerequisites
Geometry Trigonometry

C5631: Chemistry in Action!
Difficulty: **

What do bugs walking on water have to do with erupting bottles of soda? Find out through some exciting chemistry experiments!

C5790: The Physics of Gravitational Waves
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Albert Wandui

Last year, LIGO made a groundbreaking discovery - the gravitational wave signal from the inspiral, merger and ringdown of two black holes in a binary system. We will explore the science of how this discovery was made and discuss what we can learn about our universe by detecting gravitational signals. We will also discuss future experiments in gravitational wave astronomy and play around with some real data from LIGO.


Prerequisites
High school math and physics

C5533: How to Design a Research Project: ISEF Style
Difficulty: ***

Three different High School International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) participants, in fields ranging from Biochemistry to Energy to Nanomaterials share their perspectives on research, how to get involved, and how to make your work meaningful. Each will also provide an overview of their own project. The session as a whole will allow students to not only learn about research, but perhaps think of some ideas of their own.


Prerequisites
An interest in STEM, curiosity, and a love of problem solving. Bring questions with you! That is why we are here!

C5651: Polymer Science
Difficulty: **

Polymers are fascinating materials that can be found almost everywhere in our daily lives. From the plastics we buy at the store to the skin on our bones, polymers come in all shapes and sizes. Due to their interesting and special properties, polymers are used in many applications, from flexible materials to electronic devices to complex fluids. In this short course, taught by the Stanford Polymer Collective, we'll learn about polymers through fun hands-on activities that highlight some of their most important properties.

C5498: Fun with Chemistry

Chemistry is exciting and it happens all around us every day. In this class we will talk about the states of matter, a little about polymers (like plastics), and really anything else that gives us a chance to do cool demos for you all! You may get a chance to make a souvenir to take home, too. You'll just have to come and find out!

C5519: Introduction to General Relativity
Difficulty: *****

This class will cover a few essential concepts from General Relativity. Our goal is to introduce students to the metric tensor, a key object in the study of GR. We will discuss how physicists relate mathematical formulation to physical understanding. Subtopics will include: coordinate transformations, tensor notation, the Einstein equations, and spacetime curvature.


Prerequisites
Calculus, Classical Mechanics

C5551: The Basics of Protein Structure
Difficulty: ****
Teachers: Darius Johnston

This course teaches the basic amino acids that define our proteins and discusses the basic concepts of primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures.


Prerequisites
Basic chemistry Basic physics

C5606: Edible Chemistry
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Abigail Taussig

Why do gummy bears glow when you electrocute them? What's that?? You've never electrocuted a gummy bear before?!?! Come explore the chemistry behind your favorite foods.

C5745: Taking Baby Pictures of the Universe
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Albert Wandui

This will be a broad and general introduction to big bang cosmology. We will discuss the Big Bang and the evolution of the universe since then. We will then discuss current exciting research efforts to study the early universe including using microwave telescopes to image the Cosmic Microwave Background. This class will be focused on the experimental efforts to study the early universe


Prerequisites
Mechanics and a bit of familiarity with waves especially the electromagnetic spectrum.

C5662: Quantum Key Distribution: How Can Quantum Mechanics Secure Your Communication?
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Ching-Yang Yu

What is “quantum”? How does the weirdness of quantum mechanics promise another revolution in information technology?
In this class, you’ll learn the basic principles of quantum mechanics, and apply these principles to understand quantum key distribution, a perfectly secure way for communication. The class will foster physical understanding through demonstrations during lecture.


Prerequisites
Algebra; trigonometry

C5827: Real Science: What It Is and How to Spot BS
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Lots of people talk about what “Scientists say” and what is “experimentally proven”. We all want to be rational and make good decisions.

But what is science, really? And how do you know when someone is just trying to BS you by throwing around the word “science”? We’ll talk about that, and, like real scientists, do some real experiments.

C5887: Nanotechnology: Small Science With Big Impact
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Fariah Hayee, Alice Lay

What is nanotechnology? Learn how nanotechnology can improve solar cells, kill cancer cells, and even filter water for drinking.

C5881: Predicting the Future: With Chemistry!
Difficulty: *

Fortune-telling, or predicting the future, is often associated with psychics and witches, but it's actually something that scientists do all the time.

In this class, we will take you on a tour of the predictive power of chemistry---from Dmitri Mendeleev in 1867 predicting an element's properties 70 years before it was discovered, to today, where we use computer simulations to predict the properties of materials that have never been made before.


Prerequisites
You should have been exposed to the idea that atoms are the building blocks of matter, and possibly have seen a periodic table before. These are suggestions, but not required!

C5507: Rain From Space: Cosmic Rays
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Richard Nally

The Earth is constantly being hit by high-energy particles from space. Although invisible to the eye, these "cosmic rays" hit the atmosphere and erupt into a shower of lighter partices, which can be seen by specialized, ground-based detectors. These muons in these cosmic rays have been some of the most energetic particles we have ever seen. In this class, we will discuss cosmic rays, and from them learn about both particle physics and astrophysics.

C5552: An Introduction to Experimental Particle Physics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ryan Linehan

All of matter is made from elementary particles that are smaller than atoms. But wait, if these particles are so small, how can we possibly study them?

This class is an introduction to how physicists detect and study subatomic and elementary particles. We'll first discuss some properties of different subatomic particles and how they interact with each other. Following that, we'll use the LArIAT detector at Fermilab as a case study of detector techniques and technology.


Prerequisites
Some basic knowledge about electromagnetism and chemistry is good, but it's not absolutely required.

C5742: Chemistry of Photography Full!

Learn the basics of photography using chemicals! Today, almost every phone has a camera, and every camera today uses electronic technology. But did you know digital cameras only started becoming popular 20 years ago? Before then, photography was done with chemistry. In this class, we'll talk about some of the processes used and then you can make your own chemical photograph using the cyanotype process, which is the origin of the term "blueprint."

C5777: General Theory of Relativity: Einstein's Curved Spacetime and Black Holes
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Stanislav Fort

This class will provide an introduction to the currently most accurate theory of gravitation - Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. Using simple mathematics, we will describe the basic concepts of the theory, its applications, and consequences. Among other things, we will talk about gravitational waves, black holes, and the geometry of the Universe.


Prerequisites
Good knowledge of basic mathematics. Calculus advantageous, but not necessary. Classical mechanics, including Newton's law of gravity and orbits.

C5516: Electron Flow
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andy Ylitalo

We often associate electricity with fire, but in this class you'll learn how the flow of electricity in circuits is almost identical to the flow of water through pipes! We bring this idea to life through hands on demos, live experiments, and data analysis.

C5794: Chemistry of Food
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bette Webster

Learn about how chemistry is essential to cooking and tasting food. Why is food spicy? Why does jello jiggle? How do baked goods rise? How can we make substitutions for key ingredients?

C5485: From Molecular Motion to Biological Machines with Langevin Dynamics
Difficulty: *****
Teachers: Bruno Beltran

Did you know that your body is made up of more than 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 molecules?

From zebra stripes to patterns on snakes to the spacing between the bones in your spine, biological systems have to control their organization by positioning individual molecular signals in this sea of molecules.

With so many chemicals floating around, how do organisms control the position of individual types?

In the first half of the class, we will learn how to use simple ideas from physics to mathematically describe the motion of individual molecules diffusing and reacting in a biological system. We will learn exactly it means for something to move around "randomly", and use this new understanding to derive the "Langevin Dynamics" approach to atomic simulation using only the simple fact that molecules react by colliding with each other.

In the second half of the class, we will use our new physics knowledge to work as a class on a real question from biology. Example questions that will be chosen from are: How can an embryo create the pattern of signals needed to form its spinal column during development? How can the tiny bacterial cells all around us move the two copies of their DNA into each new cell when they split in two, even without anything to pull two copies of the DNA apart? Students will have a chance to see what it feels like to do work on the cutting edge of these fields. There will also be cool videos of each system to help the class decide what to work on.


Prerequisites
Students should have encountered the idea that all matter is made of molecules, and that molecular reactions happen when two molecules collide with each other. Students should be able to follow every step of the math as long as they are comfortable with the material in Calculus I. Necessary topics from probability theory and differential equations will be introduced during class. This class is a follow up for "B5154: From Bouncing Molecules to Stripes and Spines". That class is not a strict per-requisite, but will help the student get more out of the second half of this class.

C5559: Chemistry & Renewable Energy
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Peter Csernica

Lean some of the ways that chemistry can provide us with renewable energy today & in the future! We will focus on two electrochemical devices: batteries and fuel cells. You will learn the very basics of how they work, and we will discuss their similarities and differences. Class will include a working mini-Fuel Cell Car as a demo!

Class will focus mostly on understanding the basics of how both devices operate, and should be accessible to anyone with an interest in learning more! Will be an interactive lecture.


Prerequisites
An interest in learning more about the subject.

C5598: Introduction to Nanochemistry Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Caitlin Hogan

Have you ever thought about building tiny structures atom by atom? Nanochemistry is concerned with just that! We will be learning about the differences in molecular behavior on the nanoscale that make nanomaterials so unique and useful, as well as some cool recent applications of nanotechnology, such as nanobiosensors and quantum dot solar cells.


Prerequisites
knowledge of some chemistry (atoms, photons, fluorescence, molecular bonding)

C5638: From Radio Waves to Gamma Rays: the Electromagnetic Spectrum
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Eric Yue Ma

Are diverse phenomena ranging from radio waves to visible light to Gamma rays really the same physical process? Why do they interact so differently with matter? In this class I will give a broad survey across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, with a focus on connections to everyday life.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of electric, magnetic field and electromagnetic induction. Basic concept of waves.

C5674: Small, Smaller, Smallest: What Can and Can’t We See Using Microscopes?
Difficulty: **

Since the invention of the microscope in the 17th century, microscopes have played an indispensable role in many fields of research: from medical sciences to engineering, and from earth sciences to biology. But what can we see using different types of microscopes? And what can’t we (yet) see? In this class, we will dive into various microscopy techniques and see examples of state-of-the-art research!

C5773: Engineering with Mentos and Soda in Small, Competing Groups! Full!
Difficulty: **

Can you design the most spectacular Mentos and soda reaction? You'll start with Seltzer water, Mentos, and coke ingredients. What you do to make it better is up to you!

Let the best team win! Winners in categories of Best Team Name, Most Spectacular Reaction, Best Teamwork

Wear sunscreen/ hat; we will be outside.


Prerequisites
NONE

C5789: Physics of Sound and Music
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Hunter Swan

What makes the sound of an instrument distinct from other sounds around us, like blowing wind or crashing waves or a person talking? In this class, we'll look at the physics of sound and what makes sound musical. Students will get a chance to look at the sound waves generated by instruments and produce their own sound waves. Depending on time and student interest, we will also discuss some of the mathematical tools for describing sound (and waves in general), and Fourier analysis, in particular.


Prerequisites
* Trigonometry (sines, cosines, radians, etc.) * Algebra * You should know what an infinite series is (e.g. a geometric series)

C5817: Battery Chemistry
Difficulty: ***

We will discuss the chemical and physical properties of batteries and why they are valuable to us. We will do a couple hands-on activities to investigate batteries.

C5837: Living Fluid Mechanics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Arnold Mathijssen

Many biological processes are controlled by fluid dynamics: Molecules are actively transported inside cells, many marine animals like starfish larvae generate their own flows to draw in food, bacteria use intriguing hydrodynamic mechanisms to swim and form colonies on surfaces, and organisms can even communicate or synchronise their motion via pressure waves.

In this short introduction we will discuss the basic concepts of ‘living fluid mechanics’. The focus will not be on maths and equations, but on ideas and new strategies we can learn from the fascinating world around us. Expect many pictures and videos, and perhaps a couple of live demonstrations!

This class should be understandable to 7th graders but interesting for anyone up to researchers, simply because biology has so many layers of complexity. The question is: what to look for? After we develop an idea what animals can do with liquid flows, we can try to explain how they live underwater, and why they behave as they do. Curiosity is central in this path towards discovery!


Prerequisites
Desire for knowledge:)


Engineering

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E5819: The Heart of a Rocket
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Calvin Lin

From SpaceX's Falcon 9 to NASA's Saturn V, these rockets all had one major goal: deliver their payload into space. Rocket payloads have ranged in the past from satellites to human-carrying spacecrafts to rovers intended to explore Mars. In this class, you will learn about the engineering fundamentals that go behind building a rocket payload as while as catch some handy rocket science knowledge and history on the way. This class is intended for space fanatics and just about anyone curious about the progress of human exploration.

E5901: Motorcycles and Mechanisms Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joe Johnson

We’ll be taking apart my 1964 Honda Dream motorcycle and exploring how it works.

Students will get hands on experience taking things apart and putting them back together.

Here’s a picture of a motorcycle similar to mine: http://www.rcycle.com/Ken_Fisher_Honda_305_Dream_068_cropped_op_800x512.jpg


Prerequisites
Be Hands-On

E5658: Energy at Hand

A hands-on exploration of the ways energy is produced today, the repercussions of fossil fuels, and the challenges of renewables.

E5695: Designing and Building Modern Digital Systems: Demystifying Computers
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Nipun Agarwala

In this class, we will embark on a short adventure on how modern digital systems work. We will start with the fundamentals of a digital device through digital logic and basic circuits and then learn how the following components work, what intelligent techniques are used and how they connect to the overall computer:
CPU, ROM, RAM, Hard Drive, USB, Display etc.

We will cover topics like Pipelining, Caching, basic Compilers, Machine language and the interface where the software meets the hardware. Using the iPhone as an example, we will see how these complex components interact to make the iPhone work so smoothly!


Prerequisites
Prior knowledge of Ohm's law and computer science is helpful, but not required. Due to the fast paced nature of the class, some aspects of the class might be challenging to students without the pre-requisites.

E5694: Practical Python Programming
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Ningrui Li

If you've taken an intro programming class before, you've probably used loops to count the number of vowels in a given word, analyzed numerous methods of sorting lists, and you can probably write a recursive function to compute the n-th term of the Fibonacci sequence in your sleep.

Have you ever thought, "Who cares?! I'll probably never have to do that again outside of class!"

If so, this class is for you! We will put together projects pertinent to problems plaguing our persons and ponder about puzzling them out through practical Python programming!


Prerequisites
Know some fundamentals about programming (loops, string manipulation, data structures, doesn't necessarily have to be in Python!) Be prepared to cooperate with other students to come up with solutions!

E5597: Designing Data-Driven Sustainable Cities

Cities are complex. They must balance built, natural, and human systems. Explore the nuances of defining and measuring important characteristics of urban spaces.
Collaborate with others as we brainstorm, analyze, and create a sustainable city of the future!

E5679: The Explosive History of Lithium-Ion Batteries
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michael Statt

This course will cover how the modern-day lithium-ion battery came to be. We will answer how lithium-ion batteries work, why they stop working over time, and why they sometimes explode. We will also cover some of the research being done to solve these problems for next-generation lithium batteries.


Prerequisites
A basic course in chemistry is heavily recommended.

E5820: LED Multiplexing Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Arjun Balasingam

Ever wonder how your LED displays work? In this class, students will learn about time-division multiplexing, a popular technique used to control light matrices like electronic displays. The class will begin with an introduction to multiplexing and an overview of the design. Students will then work together to implement their own multiplexed LED display circuits, and program a microcontroller to drive the displays.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of circuits

E5596: The Truth About Flight Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Rick Fenrich

What makes an airplane fly? Why are airplanes shaped like they are? This class takes a brief look at the history, physics, and engineering behind flight, and ends with a paper airplane contest where you can test out your own flying creation.


Prerequisites
Basic algebra. Interest in science/physics.

E5634: Intro to Solar Energy
Difficulty: ***

We will cover the basic principles of converting light from the sun into usable electricity using semiconducting materials. We will also talk about some of the exciting new advances in solar energy technology and the potential impact of solar energy on the world's energy landscape.

E5667: Stormwater Engineering
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nabiul Afrooz

This class is designed to introduce the students to the type of engineering measures we can take to manage our stormwater. There will be hands-on activity to demonstrate how we can purify our stormwater using low-cost filter materials.

E5760: Engineering at Stanford
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Tim Abbott

Come hear from current Stanford students what it's like to study engineering in college! A variety of disciplines and interests will be represented.

E5818: An Introduction to Earthquake Engineering
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Cristian Acevedo

Earthquakes are one of Earth's most devastating phenomena. Come learn about earthquake mechanisms and design of structures in earthquake prone areas (like California) and experience shaking first hand!
The class will cover the basic physics behind structural earthquake engineering design; the focus will be on explaining concepts through demonstrations.

E5556: Materials Gone Wrong! Full!

It's a bad day if your phone screen cracks, but it's something else entirely if your airplane falls out of the sky. Learn about the science and engineering behind materials failures in history through demonstrations and hands-on experiments. Emphasis on HANDS-ON demonstrations, not a boring lecture! We'll experience first-hand how liquid metals can catastrophically destroy structural materials in applications like space exploration and aerospace. We'll explore how many materials can change dramatically with changes in structure, temperature, and other conditions. You'll walk away from this class with greater knowledge of the atomic structure of materials and a deeper appreciation for the diverse properties of the materials that surround our everyday life.

E5654: A Brief Introduction to Holography
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Stephen Hamann

This class will cover what is (and is not) a hologram with a short history of holography and the basic physical concepts of coherent light. Several techniques for analog and digital holography will be discussed, with demonstrations of several types of holograms and not-holograms.

E5766: Sewable Electronics Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vivian Wang

Learn about the basics of circuits and sewing through a small hands-on sewable circuit project, which you get to keep and take home! We will use sewable LEDs, snaps, and coin batteries, connected together with conductive thread (no soldering required!). If you have extra fabric scraps, old T-shirts, or spare components you wish to use, feel free to bring them.


Prerequisites
This class is intended for beginners—no knowledge of electronics or sewing required! If you have background knowledge in this area, you might be bored for part of class.

E5483: What is Computer Science? Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Nick Troccoli

Computer science is more than just programming - it's learning how to solve problems using computers. This class will teach you the fundamentals of computer science and how to think like a computer scientist: how to solve programming problems, understand what a computer is doing, and most importantly how to approach programming bugs if they come up. Join us and learn what computer science is all about!

E5555: Design Thinking Full!
Difficulty: *****

Do you want to be crazy and create, and solve really challenging in the world around you? If so, this class is for you. We're going to learn Design Thinking by making you designers and sending you on a 2 hour design scavenger hunt in teams. Design thinking is a tool for solving problems with humans at the center, and is used by innovative organizations all accross the world like IDEO, Stanford, and Apple.

E5693: Product Development: From Idea to Launch
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Nipun Agarwala

Do you have a product idea that you are passionate about but don't know how to execute? There are multiple aspects to creating a software product - discovering the idea, conceptualizing the user experience, technical development, and business strategy. In this class, we briefly cover and provide an overview of all these aspects and how they fit together. The goal of the class is for you to take away an understanding of how a product is developed and how you can take your own ideas from concept to launch!


Prerequisites
Some programming experience is recommended but not necessary. Due to the fast paced nature of the class, certain concepts may be more challenging for those without prior knowledge of programming/computer science.

E5801: Lights, Chips, and Circuits Full!
Difficulty: **

Have you ever wondered what it is that runs our world? The electronics that powers everything from your home systems to your computers to, well, nearly everything now? In this hands-on-class, you'll get to build circuits, understand why they work, and then see them in action!


Prerequisites
A little bit of algebra and an interest in electricity and making stuff.

E5893: Electronics and Their Applications
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Gerard Touma

Introduction to electronics, how they work, and their various applications in medicine, consumer products, wireless communication, and others.

E5665: Optical Phenomena
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Genna Smith

In this class we will learn about some basic properties of light including color, refraction, and polarization. We will not only explore the theory but will see how they manifest in the real world through hands-on demonstrations.

E5808: Construct a Dream Toy with Design Thinking!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Monica Chan, Ye Wang

This is a fun-filled, fast-paced class where we will explore Design Thinking as a method for building empathy and solving problems. We will then discover some interesting technologies together to help you construct a Dream Toy for whomever you'd like to build! Let's have fun with rapid prototyping, tinkering and interactive tools!


Prerequisites
Willingness to share ideas with peers in class, and TONS of enthusiasm to explore!

E5557: Build Your Own Speaker Full!

Each student will build a simple styrofoam cup speaker. We will learn about sound, audio signals, how speakers work, and basic circuits.


Prerequisites
Please bring a portable music player such as an MP3 player or smartphone if you have one. A few extras will be available to use if you do not have one.

E5607: Rube Goldberg Challenge Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Matthew Volk

Engineering is all about working together! In this class we will first learn about the different kinds of engineering and then break into groups that are each responsible for building one component of a giant Rube Goldberg machine. The ultimate challenge? Trying to put them all together at the end!


Humanities

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H5793: Humanities at Stanford
Difficulty: *

Come hear about the humanities opportunities going on around campus! There will be a panel of actors, dancers, musicians and writers who can answer any of your questions!

H5701: The Short Stories of Borges
Difficulty: **

The short fiction of Jorge Luis Borges (1899 - 1986) is at once fantastical and philosophical, dialoging with an extensive landscape of ideas and thinkers by means of metaphors and metafictional devices. In this class we will explore the effect to which Borges puts these contrivances to use (while also marvelling at the bizarre and unique worlds he creates) by reading and discussing a few of what we consider to be his best stories. No prior knowledge of Borges or his work will be assumed.

H5781: Intro to Finnish Language and Culture
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Maria Haanpaa

Are you interested in learning more about Finnish language and culture? This class will teach you how to introduce yourself in Finnish and use other interesting phrases. This class will also introduce students to some fun aspects of Finnish culture. Finnish snacks will be provided!

H5545: Creative Writing Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Will Fein

When I was first put in a creative writing classroom, it changed my life. I want to provide that experience to other students. This will be a class where we talk quickly about types of effective writing and then try it ourselves!


Prerequisites
None

H5826: The Birth of Science
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Where did science come from? Who were the heroes who invented it? Why wasn't it invented sooner?

In this class, we'll talk about the exciting story of how we went from alchemy to chemistry, from astrology to astronomy. We'll talk about the epic debate about whether it was the earth or the sun in the center of the universe, discussing the discoveries and politics involved. You'll hear about popes and kings, monks and bishops, and even a few professors.

If that's not enough, I'll tell you:

*Why practically nobody thought the earth was flat
*How Galileo accomplished the greatest troll of all time
*Why it's really hard to prove that the earth revolves around the sun (without satellites)

H5896: History of Cartography: All About Maps!
Difficulty: **

Calling all map lovers! Join me as we learn about the history of cartography, by looking at some of the most unusual (and fascinating) maps from the ancient world to today! We will talk about sea monsters on Renaissance maps, mapping cholera in nineteenth-century England, and the commercialization of cartography at worlds fairs— among other exciting topics! There will be lots of maps (and fun facts!).

H5786: Playing Indian and the Creation of American Identity
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Alexandra Stern

What does it mean to “play Indian”? How have Euro-Americans imagined their Native American neighbors since the colonial period and how have these imaginings helped construct America’s national identity? Seeking to address these questions through specific historical cases and open discussion, this course will allow students to explore the influence of Native American life and tradition on American identity, as well as consider the paradox of the simultaneous construction and destruction of Native people in American life inherent in the process.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of American history necessary for this course.

H5549: How to Look at Art
Difficulty: *

Are museums stuffy and boring or are they filled with lively artworks that teach us about history and being alive? We vote the latter! This class, co-taught by two art historians, will engage art and artifacts at the Cantor Museum and ask questions such as: Why is art important? What can art tell us about the past, the present and ourselves? This class will offer an introduction to the methods of art history and model how to use these skills to more creatively and critically engage our visual world.

H5463: Writing with Power: the Empathy Approach Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Amanda Rizkalla

This creative writing course will teach students how to use language to strike a chord with their readers. Students will receive instruction on how to use empathy as a means to evoke emotion and create meaningful scenes and situations in their writing. No experience needed — just an open mind and eagerness to write!

H5475: Esperanto for Beginners
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: KC Farrell

Kiel vi fartas? How are you doing?

Esperanto is a constructed language that combines features of Romance, Germanic, and Slavic languages. Esperanto speakers live all around the world. Many learn Esperanto to travel and meet other Esperantists (Esperantistoj) with whom they share no native language. Others learn Esperanto because it assists in learning other Latinate, Germanic, and Slavic languages. It is a beautiful language that is popular among polyglots.

In this class, we will learn the basics of Esperanto grammar and vocabulary.

Watch this interesting video to hear from people who were raised speaking Esperanto in Brasil, Belgium, Japan, Poland, and other countries: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzDS2WyemBI


Prerequisites
Love of language! You do not need to know any Esperanto! However, knowledge of another language (especially of a Latinate, Slavic, or Germanic language (such as Spanish, Polish, German, Romanian, Portuguese, et cetera)) will help but is NOT required.

H5544: Lab in Critical Thinking: The Language of Fake and Biased News
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Masoud Jasbi

This course introduces students to the basics of critical thinking and focuses on applying these basics to the language of news pieces. We cover the linguistic features of fake and biased news. Class exercises emphasize the ability to detect sources of bias in a text and be able to analyze the news piece into the main claims, supporting evidence, and background assumptions. The course also discusses practices that help us reduce bias and falsehood in our own reports and thinking.

H5612: Don't Sleep On Hip-Hop
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nathan Dadap

Over the last 25 years, hip-hop has seen an explosion in popularity. From the streets of New York to Broadway and the White House, rap's enormous cultural influence demands a rethinking of how we critically reflect on this relatively novel art form. By listening to examples by Nas, Kendrick Lamar, Joey Badass, and others, we will analyze the basic techniques employed in rap - rhyme scheme, rhythm and flow, word play, and literary techniques - to learn to better appreciate this rich and diverse American genre.

H5653: Race, Resistance, and Creative Writing Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua De Leon

“Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed” - Martin Luther King, Jr.

Especially in periods of political and cultural upheaval, the importance and power of the written word is undeniable. In the 21st century, how do we conceptualize and engage with ideas of race, ethnicity, and social justice? How can writing, as an artistic and expressive medium, elevate and center the voices of historically marginalized communities?

In this workshop, students will engage with concepts of race and social justice through a seminar and discussion format, and will then be able to explore these concepts through interactive creative writing exercises.

H5684: The Philosophies of Wittgenstein
Difficulty: ***

Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889 - 1951) is cited in some circles as the most important philosopher of the 20th century, for revolutionizing Analytic Philosophy not once but twice. His first book, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921), presents a 'picture theory' of language that sets out to explain how language represents its subject matter. It proved immensely influential with philosophers interested in making philosophy more scientific—Wittgenstein himself claimed his book resolved all philosophical problems, and never published again in his lifetime. However, he did not stop writing, and the Philosophical Investigations (1953), published posthumously, presents a completely different conception of language. Here language is understood in terms of 'language-games' through which language gains meaning by how it is used rather than by relating to its subject matter in a special way. The Philosophical Investigations proved even more influential than the Tractatus, despite being almost entirely incompatible with it.

Two opposing philosophies for one philosopher? In this class we will have a debate, with Andrew presenting and arguing for Wittgenstein's early views, and Harry his later ones. All are welcome, and we won't assume any prior knowledge of Wittgenstein or philosophy. But don't come just to hear us talk—we want you to form your own opinions by joining the debate!

H5807: Introduction to Abstract Art
Difficulty: **

Have you ever stared at a painting by Jackson Pollock and wondered, "What does this all mean?" We're here to help you find out! Using the works in the Anderson Collection, we will introduce you to some of the most significant artists of the Abstract Expressionist movement. If you've never taken an art history class before, this is a great place to start! The works we will examine are more than splatters of paint on canvas - they are rooted in the times in which they were created, but speak to what is eternal in the human experience.


Prerequisites
None! Just come ready to learn.

H5904: Days of Our Lives
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Margaret Shen

An overview of creative writing techniques focused on personal stories.

H5626: Shakespeare's Greatest Monologues
Difficulty: **

The most memorable and moving parts of many Shakespeare plays are monologues, where a character either engages with himself (a soliloquy) or declaims to another. In this class we'll read several of Shakespeare's greatest monologues, ranging in length from 12 lines (Macbeth's lament on his Lady's death) to 55 (Antony's invective at Caesar's funeral). In each case we'll put the monologue in context and watch clips to show how various actors have chosen to interpret it. This class is meant as pure poetic fun -- no prior knowledge is required!

H5646: Graphic Novels and Manga: Storytelling through images Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Evelyna Wang

We will discuss the usage of images and text in graphic novels both in western traditions and asian manga styles. What should be drawn and how should it be drawn? When do authors choose to use text rather than images? How do dynamic vs static images affect the reader experience? How does genre affect image or word styling? What should sound effects look like?
Bonus points if you show up to class in a cape

H5833: Joy: Why the World is Full of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Some have claimed that in the universe, "there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil, no good, nothing but pitiless indifference."

Is that the deepest truth about reality? Or is there something really real about the beauty of a sunset? Is there such a thing as Truth? Are there Heroes and Villains, or do people simply do what is best in their own eyes and nothing more.

We will explore the big ideas of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful. We'll hear from the ancient Greeks and the Moderns. We'll look at cognitive science as well as neuroimaging to try to find the answers. I will present the case that, despite all the popular pessimism, the proper response to the Universe is Joy.

H5553: Writing Chinese for Beginners
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Enze Chen

Chinese can be a hard language to learn compared to others, in large part because its writing system has very little phonetic basis (does not look like it sounds). But, if we just take a step back, and focus on the characters visually without a concern for their pronunciation, we begin to see some interesting patterns. In this class, we will be looking at the origins of Chinese characters and writing some! NO knowledge of Chinese required, just some imagination for visualizing the characters. :)


Prerequisites
None! Be aware, if you already know a lot of Chinese, it might get a little boring.

H5910: Creative Writing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Will Fein

When I was first put in a creative writing classroom, it changed my life. I want to provide that experience to other students. This will be a class where we talk quickly about types of effective writing and then try it ourselves!


Prerequisites
None

H5767: Photography as an Art
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Connie Xiao

Wonder what a photo is really actually trying to tell you? Interested in the history of photography? Ever question photography’s validity as an art form? Come to hear a take on photography and its place in our world! We’ll find peculiar ways to look at photos and chronicle photography throughout the years.
(Disclaimer: We won’t be taking any photography, so regardless of how good or bad you think you are at it, you should take this class!)

H5528: Existentialism: The Meaning of Life
Difficulty: ****
Teachers: Jeremy Quach

Why do I get up in the morning? How do I live a good life? What is it that gives my life meaning? Where does that meaning come from? Is there anything wrong with living a meaningless life? Such are the questions we will ponder in this introduction to existentialism, a philosophical tradition that explores how we give meaning to our lives.

No background with existentialism or philosophy is required--all you need is an open, critical mind and a curiosity about your life. We'll read selections from Milan Kundera, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Fredrick Nietzsche, and others. This class will largely be discussion focused, and students will leave the class with various ways to think about their lives and what gives it meaning. Such a journey to find meaning in this life is surely one that spans an entire lifetime, but I hope to help you begin such a journey.

H5627: The Romantics in Verse
Difficulty: **

Want to learn to write so beautifully that your words sound like they dropped from heaven? The Romantics knew how. In this class we'll read and discuss verse from the golden age of English poetry, including Shelley, Keats, Wordsworth, Blake, Coleridge and Beddoes. No prior exposure to any of these writers is necessary -- their charm will come out amply on the day!

H5676: The Life and Times of a Genius
Difficulty: *

This class will explore how a certain individual worked non-stop to single-handedly changed the face of their practice and transformed public perception of an uncommon profession. Want to know who this modern genius is? Attend this class to find out!


Prerequisites
An open mind

H5762: Talk like TED: The Art of Oral Communication
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Amy Tarangelo

In this course, we will explore how speakers at TED conferences craft effective oral presentations, and how these same communication skills can help students in high school, college, and beyond! By studying and discussing videos of top TED speakers, students will learn the habits of effective communication. Topics covered will include oral presentation skills, effective slide design, and content organization. We will also discuss common fears about public speaking and ways to overcome them. Students will then have an opportunity to practice these skills with an oral communication tutor from Stanford's Hume Center for Writing and Speaking.


Prerequisites
None

H5778: In the Devil's Snare: Solving the Mystery of the Salem Witch Trials Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexandra Stern

Witch hunting was hardly an unusual practice in early modern Europe. However, the long history of the practice cannot adequately explain America's Salem witch trials of the 1690s, in which over 200 people were accused of witchcraft. Exploring the history of Puritan life and belief in colonial America and using primary source evidence from the trials, we will seek to determine and understand the origins of the mass hysteria that produced one of the most infamous and bloody witch hunts in American history.


Prerequisites
Just an interest in early American history.

H5508: Chinese Language and Culture

This mini course aims to introduce Chinese language and culture through various interactive activities and hands-on experiences. Participants are expected to learn survival Chinese, Chinese festivals, table manners, social taboos, and how to make Chinese ties! A souvenir certificate will be given to the participants at the end of the class.

H5875: Talk to the World Full!
Difficulty: **

Like TED talks? Ever wanted to overcome an excruciating fear of public speaking? Or just be a more inspiring and engaging speaker and communicator?

Come learn with us! This will be a participatory workshop where everyone gets a chance to speak.

The teachers include TA's and Professors from Stanford's Graduate School of Business.


Prerequisites
none - just an eagerness to speak in front of people you just met.

H5465: Write It! A Creative Writing Workshop
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mina Shah

Students will engage with creative writing prompts and have a chance to start working on pieces in a genre of their choice (theater, poetry, prose). Students who feel comfortable and willing will have an opportunity to share what they've begun to create with the group.

H5644: Linguistic Archaeology: Uncovering Japan through Language
Difficulty: **

92 symbols, 2200 characters, and 4400 pronunciations. That’s about the bare minimum any native Japanese speaker knows.

Japanese is notoriously difficult to learn, and its writing system is understood to be one of the most complex in the world. But it is this complexity that makes Japanese flexible in a distinct way compared to its linguistic cousins. Why does Japanese use both alphabets (like Korean) and logographs (like Chinese)? How are new words introduced? And how can we use that to understand Japanese culture?

Using the Japanese language as a unique lens, we will explore the role of language as both a symbol of power and a living part of history. We will take a journey through time, hunting down idiosyncrasies of the Japanese language and how they came to be.

We will conclude with interesting (and tasty!) real-life examples of Japanese words that have evolved through time and cultures, extending even beyond the Japanese language.

Familiarity with basic Japanese and/or Chinese helpful, but no prior experience needed.

H5673: How To Write LIT-erature Full!
Difficulty: *

How do you go from crankin' out essays every week to creating universes only you can think of? This class is a how-to guide to writing like the next best-selling novelist?


Prerequisites
A heartbeat, a working imagination, literacy, and a willingness to get out of your comfort zone.

H5780: Metaphor
Difficulty: ****
Teachers: Jeremy Quach

When Romeo utters that "Juliet is the sun," we are surely not meant to take him literally--to think Juliet is a large sphere of flaming gas sure isn't what Romeo is trying to convey. But if the meaning of Romeo's metaphor isn't to be found in its literal content, then what is the meaning, and where can it be found?

Some theorist, such as Max Black, suggest that some words in metaphor are meant to be understood figuratively, not literally--"sun" here doesn't mean a large sphere of flaming gas, but rather, "the warmth of my life, what my day starts with, etc." Others, such as Paul Grice, think that metaphor works in implication--to say "Juliet is the sun" is literally false, so Romeo must be meaning something else, must be implying some other meaning. Donald Davidson argues that metaphors don't do their work in terms of meaning, but rather, use--they inspire us to make comparisons, but don't assert them in themselves. Finally, Kendrall Walton and David Hills find that metaphors operate in the realm of "make-believe."

This class will serve as a brief introduction to the philosophy of language and one of its toughest, most interesting problems--that of understanding metaphors. We'll check out some of the more influential theories on metaphor and some of their potential problems. No previous experience with philosophy is required--only a curious mind and a love of metaphor and figurative language is recommended. The class will largely be discussion focused, and students will leave the class with a deeper understanding of philosophy of language and how metaphors do their work. You'll likely be able to impress your English teacher as well.

H5880: New Approaches and Difficulties in Language Processing
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Eric Zelikman

The way in which computers interact with human languages is rapidly developing. Within the past few years, a variety of new techniques have emerged each with their own limitations and benefits for everything from understanding emotion in text to building maps of a language relating words.


Prerequisites
Some familiarity with grammar

H5496: Making Myths
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Emma Heath

Do you love myths? Ever imagined your own mythological world?

In the course, we'll study a few mythological traditions (focusing on the Greeks) in order to understand what makes mythology so timeless and exciting.

Then... we'll use myths as a starting point to write our own creative stories!

By the end, you'll take home the ability to talk about some mythological traditions, and have gained some key creative writing tools.

H5546: Asian American Poetry
Difficulty: **

We will be examining how language creation through poetry shapes and is shaped by the Asian American experience. We will read and discuss poetry from contemporary Asian American poets--if time permits, we will be writing our own poem.

H5624: The End of Zoos: Ethical Legitimacy and the Legacy of Imperialism
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Duncan Coleman

Our relationship with animals takes a variety of forms. We imagine animals as family members when they are our pets, use them as characters for our children's stories as metaphors for the human condition, consume them in our everyday meals as food, watch them in their wild habitat at nature parks, and keep them caged in zoos for our entertainment and education, and their conservation in the wild.

As ethically and historically conscious thinkers, we must constantly re-examine our personal, everyday relationship with animal life and how, as a collective humanity, that relationship has evolved over chronological time. By doing this, we come to understand, question, and revise our contemporary values as a society. Zoo’s make a perfect case study for exploring the growing field of animal ethics.

As legacies of European Imperialism, zoo’s reveal the continuing narrative of mastery of nature and dominance over other forms of life, including ourselves (some zoos did display more “primitive” humans since 1956). Evolving from it’s questionable origins, zoos today are largely held as bastions for species survival and pillars for fostering environmental literacy. They display the animal kingdom’s greatest hits, offering us the chance to see the globe through a microcosm of the world’s greatest mammalian megafauna. We can go to a zoo today and see elephants traversing a tiny “African Dirt-land,” or Snow Leopards lounging lazily in the “Concrete Himalayas,” or even rare Polar Bears melting under the California sun on white-painted rafts in a “fun-sized Arctic Ocean.”

Today, growing public awareness of animal consciousness has sparked debates about the ethical nature of zoos. Zoos are under attack by animal rights activists, who criticize them as commercial institutions who prioritize profit margins and entertainment over animal welfare. Zoo's tell us a different side of the story - they tells us that they allow visitors to have a unique connection to the natural world people would otherwise not have access to. Zoos, as commercial and conservation institutions, must perform an ethically precarious balancing act of many conflicting concerns – weighing animal welfare with enclosure aesthetics and ‘natural’ education, wildlife conservation investment with profit margins and entertainment, and, most significantly, the fostering of a benevolent caretaker relationship with nature with the tendency to tell an implicit narrative of human dominion and superiority over nature.

In this class, we must ask ourselves difficult ethical questions: What is the end or mission of zoos? Why do we confine animals in enclosures for us to see, instead of letting them be free in the wild? What distinguishes man from animals to justify our treatment of them? What narrative are zoo’s telling us about nature and humanity’s role in the world? Why do we value some species of animals over others for display in zoos? Are these choices arbitrary or justifiable? Given contemporary nature documentaries and rapidly declining travel costs, why do zoos still appeal to us? And finally, should zoos be banned altogether or should they be improved? If the latter, how should they be improved?

In this class, we will re-examine our human-animal relations through the lens of the zoo. We will delve into the zoo’s dark historical origins and how its mission has evolved over historical time. Then, we will tackle the variety of ethical concerns that arise upon contemplation of the end of zoos: the globally ubiquitous commercial enterprises and conservation institutions we visit to see a microcosm of the world.

H5637: China and California
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Catherine Zhao

Why are the roofs of the Main Quad of Stanford University red? There is a rumor that the roofs were once stained by the blood of Chinese railroad workers who helped build the first transcontinental railroad in the U.S. Since the 1850s’ Gold Rush, Chinese immigrants have long been an important part of Californian culture. Between 1865 and 1869, over 12,000 Chinese laborers were shipped to the U.S. to build the railroad, and many of them even lost their lives because of the harsh working environment. However, their contributions to California and to the U.S. were never appreciated. In fact, Chinese immigrants were discriminated against during the time of the Chinese Exclusion Act that lasted for almost sixty years, during the 1960’s before the Civil Rights Movements, and even today, especially after the election. All of this makes it important for us to reconsider the contributions of Chinese immigrants and question why a group of “model immigrants” were treated unfairly.

In this course, the speaker not only tells you the stories of what contributions Chinese immigrants made to California, but also invites you to participate in a play in which you will play a Chinese immigrant in five different periods: 1850s, 1890s, 1940s, 1960s and 1990s. In this interactive play, you will learn how Chinese immigrants helped build California and also have a better understanding of their hardships.

H5888: Irony Kind-of Sucks
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Zelikman

Irony is ever-present in art including literature, film, music, dance, from Shakespeare to Deadpool. Irony is closely tied to many movements and tools and signifies a specific kind of self-expression, often commenting on the expectations of a medium or of society as a whole. The class will seek to approach questions ranging from whether an artwork can be entirely ironic to the value of irony, to how irony is used and to what its impact is.

(Irony: "...an event that seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result", Oxford Dict.)


Life Skills and Hobbies

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L5782: Creativity: Improv, Writing, and Freedom of Expression Full!
Difficulty: *

Using a bit of advice and a lot of fun exercises, we'll try to teach you how being "creative" often relies upon being comfortable with yourself and embracing the weird, and how this can improve all of the various forms of expression we use.

L5504: Chess: Checkmate Your Friends! Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kevin McCormack

Chess is an ancient game of skill and intuition reserved only for the sharpest of minds and the fiercest of competitors... Psych!

Chess is a great strategy game that teaches skills of reasoning, patience, and strategy. Everyone is capable of learning the rules and enjoying one of the classic games in the world.

This class is an introduction to the wonderful game of chess. We will cover the basics from how the pieces move all the way to simple tactics. If you've always been curious about this popular game, come try your hand! We will be spending most of the time actually playing games.


Prerequisites
No prior experience necessary!

L5537: Becoming a Tutor Master
Difficulty: *

You want to start doing some community service as a volunteer tutor… You want to start earning some money after school by tutoring… But how do you tutor? This class will teach you the basics of how to teach.


Prerequisites
An interest in teaching

L5692: Elephants Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Zoe Himwich

Learn about Elephants!

L5796: Achieve 9 Hours of Sleep in High School
Difficulty: *

How can you optimize your time management techniques and study skills to produce high-quality work in the least amount of time? In this class, we will explore how students can eliminate the need for painful cramming and pulling all-nighters, while still achieving good grades.

L5838: Bicycle Repair: How to Tune Brakes Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jose Hernandez

In this course, I will teach you how to (i) replace brake pads (ii) adjust brakes. This is essentially the brakes part of a "tune-up". We will be focusing on v-brakes.

If we find ourselves with extra time, I can talk about derailleurs or other types of brakes!


Prerequisites
You will probably get a bit greasy.

L5592: Media Bias in the United States: How to Find Truth in a Post-Factual World
Difficulty: *

Alternative facts. Fake news. Liberal media bias. Enemy of the American People.

All of these terms have been used to describe what is reported in the news today. Underlying these accusations is the notion that media, the newspapers, websites and television that provide coverage of current events and social issues, do not accurately report this content.

But does media bias truly exist? If it does, where does it come from, and why does it matter? Most importantly, what practices can mitigate media bias, and what can YOU do about it?

This class will offer a review of the evidence for media bias in the United States. We will cover simple yet essential strategies that anyone can employ to stay informed, as well as common mistakes that can get in the way of staying objective.

Take this class to discuss these issues and learn how YOU can defend truth in a post-factual world.


Prerequisites
None. Facts are for everyone!

L5670: True to Your Heart: Taking Charge of Your Emotions to Achieve Your Goals
Difficulty: *

Do you have trouble with developing good homework habits? Do you sometimes feel paralyzed by a fear of failing or disappointing others? Have you ever had a conflict with your friends or your parents that left you with too many feelings to deal with?

We will walk through some basic ideas, tips, and tricks for recognizing your emotions, breaking old habits, and closing the gap between what you want and what you do. Through some hands-on activities and discussions, we will help you face your own emotions bravely and compassionately, and make choices true to yourself. As you transition to high school, make new friends, and mature into adulthood, these skills will be essential while you learn to adapt to an ever-changing and sometimes confusing world around you.

L5886: Wanderlusting in College: A Guide to Travelling Abroad
Difficulty: *

Have you felt the undeniable urge to explore outside of the U.S.? Whether it be volunteering in another country, taking classes on a cruise ship, or doing research at another university, there are many ways to incorporate travel into your education. This discussion-based class explores various pathways you can get involved in studying, working, or just plain ol' travelling abroad while in college. You will leave with various travel resources to plan your next trip and tips to be aware of when going to a new country.


Lunch

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L5914: Lunch Period
Difficulty:
Teachers:

Enjoy a break for lunch with your friends! Please register for at least one lunch period on each day of the program.


Life Skills and Hobbies

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L5810: Behind the Scenes of Entrepreneurial Capital
Difficulty: **

Ever wondered how Snapchat was valued at $24 billion in its recent IPO? Let's learn about key financial concepts together to understand how businesses function. Walk away equipped with entrepreneurial finance and accounting principles to perhaps apply to your future startup!


Prerequisites
Courage to step out of your comfort zone!

L5834: Happiness and Well-Being in High School and College
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Carter Osborne

We all have our own ideas about being happy. For you, happiness might come from hanging out with your friends, doing well in school, laying on your couch watching hours of Netflix while eating Ben & Jerry's ice cream.... It's different for everyone.

This class will be an in-depth discussion about the various theories behind a happy life, and the general practices that you can use to find more happiness in your day-to-day activities.

In addition, we will talk broadly about mental health (positive and negative), emotional well-being, and how to stay sane during the crazy years of high school and college.


Prerequisites
Positive energy and an open mind!

L5879: The Art of Tweak Piloting [Paper Airplanes]
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eugene Kim

Have a paper airplane that consistently fails to take off? Want to make it fly (a bit more)?

So it flies. Want to manipulate how it flies?

Learn how to tweak bits of a paper airplane's wings to make it do what YOU want! (obeying the laws of physics)

L5525: Bird Basics
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rebecca Shi

Have you ever seen a brightly colored bird in your backyard or a raptor flying overhead, and wondered what it was? Come learn a few basics of birdwatching and how to identify backyard and other common birds! After an introduction to IDing birds, we will head outside to search for the common birds around Stanford.

Designed for students who have no experience with identifying birds, but an enthusiasm to learn about the natural world.

L5890: How to Solve Cryptic Crosswords Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milind Rao

In cryptic crosswords, candles are wicked things, veto is a spoiled vote, and Thames is the flower of London. Unlike in traditional quick crosswords, clues are packed with wordplay and are quite misleading on the surface. This does not mean they are harder! In class, we will learn a few techniques to see through the skulduggery and then collaboratively solve a full cryptic crossword. These are all the rage in countries ranging from the UK, Kenya, India to Australia and we will hopefully see why!


Prerequisites
You like playing with words (puns have some utility here)!

L5892: Star Wars, James Bond and Disney: Gender in the Modern Age
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lachlan Green

How do movies, TV, and the media shape our understanding of manhood and womanhood? And how does that presentation of gender influence us? In this class, we'll wrestle with these questions, via movie clips, activities, and discussion. We'll begin by thinking about how certain expectations around each gender are defined and reinforced. Drawing on examples from pop culture, we'll talk about what kinds of traits we associate with men and women, and why that is. Then, we'll consider how those expectations can be damaging to both genders. Finally, we'll talk about how being aware of this presentation of gender empowers each of us to be a more thoughtful consumer of media and a more compassionate person. Come by for a fun and illuminating discussion! There will be snacks.