Sign in or create an account above for account-specific details and links

For Splash Students

For Splash Teachers and Volunteers

  • Click the "Get Involved" tab for more information.


ESP Biography



BRADLEY EMI, Splash enthusiast




Major: Physics, CS

College/Employer: Stanford

Year of Graduation: 2018

Picture of Bradley Emi

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I'm an undergraduate at Stanford majoring in physics. I'm currently working on deep reinforcement learning for robotics applications. In the past, I've worked on experimental cosmology research at JPL, studying jet reconstruction algorithms at SLAC, and analyzing white dwarf stars at the US Naval Observatory.

I'm currently part of the admin team that puts Stanford Splash together. Previously, I've served as co-president and co-director, and I've specifically focused on our outreach program.

I love talking about physics, education, and Splash. I especially love talking about ways to get involved with making Splash happen!



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

M6507: Computer Science at Stanford in Splash Spring 2018
Come learn about what it's like to study Computer Science in college! Taught by a panel of Computer Science students at Stanford.


M6161: Computer Science at Stanford in Splash Fall 2017
Come learn about what it's like to study Computer Science in college! Taught by a panel of Computer Science students at Stanford.


S5191: Stanford Splash: Behind the Scenes in Splash Fall 2016
Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes at Splash? We'll talk about why Splash exists and how it came to be, and how we see Splash fitting into the big-picture educational landscape. You'll learn about how Stanford Splash is organized, what we do during the other 361 days of the year, the questions about education that we like to think about, and how you can become more involved in Splash in high school and beyond.


C5192: Modern Cosmology in Splash Fall 2016
A brief introduction to cosmology, the study of the large-scale structure of the universe. We'll talk about the meaning of gravity, the geometry of the universe, cosmological parameters, the age and origin of the universe, inflation, and finish with the standard cosmological model.


M5213: Computer Science at Stanford in Splash Fall 2016
Come learn about what it's like to study Computer Science in college! Taught by a panel of Computer Science students at Stanford.


P4941: History of Physics in Splash Spring 2016
Physics is often considered the oldest science, and thinkers since the Ancient Greeks have long been debating fundamental questions about space, time, the constituents of the universe, and how they interact. These ideas have certainly evolved over time as physicists are constantly revising the work of the past, often leading to entirely new trends in scientific thought. Thomas Kuhn describes these as "paradigm shifts" in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. In this class, we will revisit these basic questions, asking ourselves what it truly means for something to be a physical theory, and for a theory to be fundamental. We will consider and discuss a definition of physics and what it seeks and does not seek to prove. We will start with how Aristotle and his contemporaries addressed these issues, then discuss the scientific revolution and how Newton's groundbreaking philosophy changed the course of physics until the 20th century. We will finally discuss the breakdown of Newtonian physics, and how quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of relativity came to the forefront of physics research. We will end by discussing current research in physics, including string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology, and talk about how these new theories address the same difficulties physicists have faced throughout history. There is no prerequisite for this class. We will go over all the relevant theories of physics on a very conceptual level. However, students with extended background in physics, or an interest in deeper mathematical insight into physical theories are encouraged to attend, as we will distribute additional material at a more advanced level for interested students. Students interested in philosophy and the philosophy of science are especially encouraged to sign up! ***Students who have previously taken this class: some of the first part of the class will be repeated material, but the second part will go through some restructuring to cover a broader range of topics, and we will have some new activities! It should be worthwhile to retake.


L4954: Research at Stanford in Splash Spring 2016
Come hear about the types of research you can do in college from current Stanford students! There will be information and a question and answer session with students who do research across the sciences and humanities.


E4955: Engineering at Stanford in Splash Spring 2016
Come hear from current engineers at Stanford about what it is like to study engineering in college!


P4639: History of Physics in Splash Fall 2015
Physics is often considered the oldest science, and thinkers since the Ancient Greeks have long been debating fundamental questions about space, time, the constituents of the universe, and how they interact. These ideas have certainly evolved over time as physicists are constantly revising the work of the past, often leading to entirely new trends in scientific thought. Thomas Kuhn describes these as "paradigm shifts" in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. In this class, we will revisit these basic questions, asking ourselves what it truly means for something to be a physical theory, and for a theory to be fundamental. We will consider and discuss a definition of physics and what it seeks and does not seek to prove. We will start with how Aristotle and his contemporaries addressed these issues, then discuss the scientific revolution and how Newton's groundbreaking philosophy changed the course of physics until the 20th century. We will finally discuss the breakdown of Newtonian physics, and how quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of relativity came to the forefront of physics research. We will end by discussing current research in physics, including string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology, and talk about how these new theories address the same difficulties physicists have faced throughout history. There is no prerequisite for this class. We will go over all the relevant theories of physics on a very conceptual level. However, students with extended background in physics, or an interest in deeper mathematical insight into physical theories are encouraged to attend, as we will distribute additional material at a more advanced level for interested students. Students interested in philosophy and the philosophy of science are especially encouraged to sign up!


L4231: A Crash Course in Alternative Education in Splash Spring 2015
"I have never let my schooling interfere with my education." -Mark Twain This class is meant for students who do not feel challenged or engaged by traditional education. Traditional education is the paradigm that is entirely shaped by going to class, doing required homework, taking tests, and doing extracurricular activities. While this works for many students, several feel trapped and constrained by the norms and values school imposes upon people. In this class, we will discuss several strategies for breaking out of the passive-mindset approach to education, which is common for many students who feel trapped by school. We will focus instead on an active-mindset approach to learning, teaching ways for the high school student to work within their current educational constraints imposed by school to take control of their own learning and academic growth. Topics we will cover include: how to use online resources to supplement learning, how to seek inexpensive or free opportunities to allow for intellectual growth, how to take on meaningful educational projects, and deciding how to pursue further education beyond high school.


H4232: Introduction to Monopoly Strategy in Splash Spring 2015
The classic board game Monopoly has a rich history, dating back to 1903, when Elizabeth Magie self-published a property trading game called The Landlord's Game. It was further refined by Charles Darrow and published by Parker Brothers to become one of the world's most popular games, with over 200,000,000 games sold, and the phrases "Go directly to jail" and "Do not pass Go" have become embedded in American culture. But Monopoly is also a deeply strategic game, requiring complex valuations of property and skilled negotiation. In this class, for the first hour, we will examine the basic strategies of Monopoly: most importantly, how to evaluate property and trades effectively, and how to protect value for the long-term. While we won't have time to complete full games of Monopoly in class, during the second hour, you will have an opportunity to test out your new skills by playing out an unfinished game of Monopoly, and at the end of class, we will compare the various strategies your classmates use, and their overall effectiveness.


H3851: Introduction to Monopoly Strategy in Splash Fall 2014
The classic board game Monopoly has a rich history, dating back to 1903, when Elizabeth Magie self-published a property trading game called The Landlord's Game. It was further refined by Charles Darrow and published by Parker Brothers to become one of the world's most popular games, with over 200,000,000 games sold, and the phrases "Go directly to jail" and "Do not pass Go" have become embedded in American culture. But Monopoly is also a deeply strategic game, requiring complex valuations of property and skilled negotiation. In this class, for the first hour, we will examine the basic strategies of Monopoly: most importantly, how to evaluate property and trades effectively, and how to protect value for the long-term. While we won't have time to complete full games of Monopoly in class, during the second hour, you will have an opportunity to test out your new skills by playing out an unfinished game of Monopoly, and at the end of class, we will compare the various strategies your classmates use, and their overall effectiveness.